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Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
pakistan describes the move against an american citizen arrested in the u.s. this week and accused of working for pakistan. this is the latest in a rapidly deteriorating relationship which was highlighted when the u.s. killed osama bin laden and pakistan. the prime minister is currently in london. my colleague asked if he understood why the u.s. had not told pakistan. >> that is the thing we did not like. >> you understand why? >> they did not want to share their victory with pakistan, they only want to share defeat. >> what they're indicating is that they did not trust the military and your security services to not leak it. >> when we had intelligence sharing with them and the people, the most wanted terrorist of al qaeda, we helped them. there was no reason not to share with us. >> did the isi note that osama bin laden was less than a mile away from your defense academy? >> he had been there for a long time. i want to ask you one question, whether the world intelligence failed? the whole failure of the world. >> did you know that bin laden was there? did your intelligence service
correspondent pamela constable, about her new book on pakistan's double game with the >> it's always sort of had this nuanced, subtle, denied unclear relationship with all these militant groups. but now it's all come back to haunt them. u.s. and the taliban. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> oil companies have changed my country. >> oil companies can make a difference. >> we have the chance to build the economy. >> create jobs, keep people healthy, and improve schools. >> ...and our communities. >> in angola chevron helps train engineers, teachers and farmers, launch child's programs. >> it's not just good business. >> i'm hopeful about my country's future. >> it's my country's future. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from vie
on g.m.t., we bring you pakistan's new jazz-playing orchestra. also a one-time presidential challenger. questioning him on bribery allegations. the heatwave across the central and eastern parts of the united states is being blamed for causing more than 20 deaths. the temperatures rising to 43 degrees centigrade. further deaths are forecasted with predictions temperatures will not fall until sunday at the earliest. >> a sweltering heat we have a is spreading across the united states, and millions are struggling to stay cool. punishing conditions have spread from southern areas to the east coast. >> tonight on world news, the hidden dangers. >> the heat is making american headlines. the national weather service has issued warnings to areas affecting for man half the population. despite thi soaring temperatures have the tragic consequences. >> in my secure they, two women died in their 70's and 30 peep have died. in big cities, cooling centers have been set up to provide emergency relief. >> i sat outside a few minutes ago, and already i'm extremely uncomfortable. a huge open-air sauna, a
to reintegrate in those areas. secondly, more broadly, put more pressure on pakistan, the biggest outside government supporter of the taliban. if they were to suddenly decide they wanted to cut a deal, that would put pressure on the taliban. unfortunately, we are not seeing across-the-board big three in all locations, nor we seeing pakistan put pressure on them -- a cross-led dashboard victory -- across-the-board- victory in all locations, nor are we seeing pakistan put pressure on them. we're seeing the taliban lose ground in the south. i suspect part of that is contesting areas that the taliban does -- >> thank you for coming in. the worst drought in decades is forcing thousands of families in east africa to walk for days to find refugee camps. the un says some very young children are dying before they ever get there. rain fell for the past three seasons. people are facing dire shortages of food, shelter, and health services. we are in a kenyan refugee camp, the largest of its kind in this world, for this story. >> day after day, mile after mile, they walked and walked. these are the pe
aid to pakistan, about one-third of its annual total. this according to administration officials. relations between the two nations have been strained, especially since that u.s. raid that killed osama bin laden only a short distance, i should say, from pakistan's leading military academy. the might of those trying to survive in the horn of africa is far outstripping the ability of anyone to help. the u.n.'s chief refugee official said today the crisis in somalia alone is the worst humanitarian disaster in the world. to give an idea of the scale he was visiting a refugee camp the size of cleveland. tony guidea has more. >> reporter: look into this child's eyes, he knows something you and i will never know how it feels to be desperately hungry. there are many children like him in this hospital in mogadishu, mall nourished children, some close to death, all refugees from the drought and violence destroying somalia. >> if you are a hungry person, somebody once told me, it feels as if there is bleach in your belly, it hurts so much. >> reporter: bettina speaks for the world food prog
libya, but it is up to the libyan people to decide. the international aid agency oxfam has said pakistan is still my sufficiently prepare to. comments come one year after the worst floods in pakistan's history, which affected 20 million people and killed over 1000 people. southern officials and sudan have accused northern sudan of declaring economic war by issuing a new currency just weeks after the south's independence, leading the country with large reserves of useless money. south sudan began using its own currency one week ago. now time to take a look at the business news. nice to see you. not good news for those watching the u.s. economy and the debt crisis. there's still no agreement between the white house and the folks on capitol hill. >> the time is ticking away. what is interesting is the markets do not seem to share that sense of urgency. there's a feeling in the market that this will get sorted out and that they will somehow come to a compromise. i have to say that it would be a strain for a u.s. president to risk the u.s. aaa credit rating at this time. many believe there wi
for an illegal workers looking for work in saudi arabia. four yemeni nationals have been arrested. pakistan's un rights commissions has criticized -- for failing to stop organized killings. much of the violence is between organized games with more than 1000 people shot dead since january. the gang enjoyed the patronage of the political parties. un security forces are reported to have shot dead six anti- rs hrnment protestoresr in amas. more than 20 were arrested on monday. india's foreign minister arrived in the bangladeshi capital. he will be holding talks with senior officials to sort out differences along standing issues. success will pave the way for a high-profile visit by the prime minister singh in september. >> india and bangladesh are supposed to be neighbors, but they have the range of contentious issues, raning from sharing waterston demarcation of the boundary in the bay of bengal. the two neighbors share more than 50 rivers, but bangladesh believes it is not giving enough water, as india has a number of dams upstream. the two sides are hoping to reach an interim agreement on sharing
. pakistan? where would you focus your attention? >> pakistan's an important challenge. there's not much we can do about it. we've tried all sorts of things there and nothing seems to work. i would say revitalizing our relationships in asia and the pacific. that's where history the going to be written in the 21st surgeriry. i would say involved there. better relations with ind ka ya with the countries of southeast asia. doing something about our energy situation that we're less vulnerable on vagaries of price and supply that would go a long way. again, i'd focus more at home on competitiveness, on improving our immigration policy. on the quality of our schools. on the quality of our transportation infrastructure and so forth. again, we have got to retore the foundations of american power. that's a prerequisite if we're going to lead in the world either by what we do or our example. >> restoration is the theme. i hope it's the subject of the next book. thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks, andrea. >> it's very provocative richard. >>> a word of warning the images you're about to see is h
pakistan's minister for minorities condemned the blasphemy law, militants executed him in broad daylight. in egypt, as the gentleman from new jersey has stated, 23 men, women and children were killed in a bombing at an alexandria church in egypt on new year's eve, just last may, treekists attacked christians at a church in cairo, leaving 12 dead and hundreds wounded. we are fortunate -- i wish these were isolated cases but i could provide countless other examples from afghanistan to india to saudi arabia. we're fortunate to live in a country that was founded by religious refugees on principles of tolerance. but it is important that we do everything we can to ensure that religious minorities elsewhere in the world enjoy the freedoms and protections they deserve, the freedoms and protections enjoyed by all americans, appointing this special envoy will be an important step in that direction and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. smith: i yield such time
.s. raid into pakistan that led to the killing of osama bin laden. you also would do away with, in essence, the c.i.a. why did you oppose the raid and what would you put in the place of it? >> well, the question to me was i was just saying it could be done differently. i mean, all this does was raise questions and i predicted that this would lead to a lot of resentment and think of the chaos in pakistan and the mess that we have. we both bomb them and give them money and people hate their own government because their own government's a puppet of ours. my frustration with bin laden was it took so long. >> woodruff: and the c.i.a., you would.... >> couric: i don't think the c.i.a. should be a military arm of the government dropping bombs secretly. you can't even separate the two. you don't even know who is controlling the bombing of this country now. >> woodruff: a couple questions about your campaign. you have a son who was elected to the united states senate rand paul from the state of kentucky. this is your third try for president. there was some talk he was looking at running for preside
that as al qaeda leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, that it is not able to be defined as a safe haven in somalia. since the fall of the mass -- the last national government in 1991, somaliland both the autonomous areas of somalia, have been the only areas with effective governance. somali man seeks international recognition while it truly does not. the question of whether the united states and international committee for the recognizing somaliland or support it integration into greater somalia at some future point requires ongoing an examination and discussion. consequently, today's hearing offers a viable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somali. now i return to ranking member, mr. payne, for comments he might have. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank you and mr. royce for calling this very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce, acting chair the african subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as has
in afghanistan, pakistan, yemen. and i urge this subcommittee to let somalia to guide your policy on somalia rather than any other country. >> i echo my colleagues sentiments. to answer your question, i think we need to look at not only the threat that emanates from there, which does affect our way of life, the freedoms that we enjoy, commerce, threats to navigation, the very real threat irrespective of how are when they got there, the fact that al shabaab has been possible to other terrorist movements and extremist groups allowing them to operate in somalia creating a hodgepodge of characters gathered there, introducing them to reach other, including introducing them to the 30 americans with european and australian passports that of now gone through. for all of those reasons, we need to be concerned. we need to be concerned because we take for granted the areas in somalia and it is not the chaos that we imagine, but south central areas mainly where the conflict is. as the ambassador said earlier, it has been one of the most democratic states in the region. they have its problems, some of wh
talks, and talk to journalist pam constable about her new book on pakistan. i'm judy woodruff. >> lehrer: and i'm jim lehrer. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online, and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: chevron. we may have more in common than you think. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. ♪ >> union bank has put i
interests or an authorization debate in the congress. given all that is at stake in pakistan, afghanistan, iran, saudi arabia, egypt, syria, yemen and elsewhere in the islamic world, a rational strategic assessment would not devote sizable american military and economic resources to a civil war in libya. it is an expensive diversion that leaves the united states and our european allies with fewer assets to respond to other contingencies. under the constitution, it is our responseability to determine whether we should be a party to libya's civil war. as a part of this process we will consider the terms and scope of the joint resolution before us today. i'm concerned this resolution would provide broad authorities, permitting significant expansion of the united states military involvement in libya's civil war. the resolution would authorize the president to reescalate united states military involvement in libya, to and potentially beyond the lead role it played at the beginning of the operation when the united states carried out intensive airstrikes on a daily basis. the resolution would on
as the leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, it is not able to be fined a safe haven. since the fall in 1991, somalia both now areas of somalia have been the only areas of effective governance. they seek international recognition, but others do not. while they recognize obvious support the eventually integration into greater somalia requires ongoing support. today's hearing offers a valuable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somalia. i'd like to now turn to ranking member, mr. payne, for any comments he might have. >> thank you very. let me thank you for calling the very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce back who chaired the subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as have congressman smith. and so it's a pleasure to be here at this very important hearing. unfortunately, i will have to leave a few minutes before ii. -- 2:00. i've been invited to be a part of the presidential delegation that will celebrate the new state o
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)